George Soros Journey to a Successful Philanthropy Mission

George Soros is the World’s most celebrated self-made billionaire alive. He has been able to accumulate billions of dollars through his investments as a hedge fund manager. Through the funds, he has managed to donate over $18 b till today, and the figure keeps on counting. He has volunteered towards helping the people shape their destinies and has also stood with many people for who they are. His mission is to change the livelihood of the people around the globe. The great Soros has also come from far. He did not find the wealth ready materials resources on the table. He has traveled in search of this greener pasture. George Soros was born and brought up in Hungary on August 12, 1930, in a city called Budapest. He was born during the times when Nazi Germany was occupying Hungary. He survived the occupation which killed over 500, 000 people. He has great desires for higher education despite the challenges they faced at Hungary. His quench made him emigrate from Hungary to London, England. At the University, he studied a bachelors masters degrees in philosophy thereby becoming a good scholar. He used to encounter a lot of difficulties while at the University and had to look for a job. He got a job as a railway porter so that he could support his education.

George Soros while at the London School of Economics tried so many things so that he could sustain himself while still at the college. He decided to relocate to the New York City in the year 1956 so that he could start his career in the finance industry. Nothing comes easily, and Soros started looking for banking jobs everywhere. He describes the moment as his lowest point in his entire life. His potential employers were so frustrating, and few bothered to invite Soros for interviews. Soros was lucky to get a job as a clerk at Singer & Friedlander which he says that he secured the position just because the manager was a Hungarian. Otherwise, he would have been jobless for long. He worked as an arbitrator at the company. While still struggling with the meager salary, he was referred by a friend to FM Mayer and more information click here.

The company FM Mayer was a Wall Street brokerage firm which George Soros was lucky to join. He later after several years of employment decided to open his firm. The company was called Soros Fund and was formed after he quit Double-Edge, a company they had formed in collaboration with his sons and a billionaire called Jim Rodgers. Today, Soros Fund Management called Quantum Fund Endowment which happens to be the largest hedge fund manager in the World. He has tirelessly worked for the success of the company and has in no doubt become the wealthiest people across the globe. He is also among the top most successful Hedge Fund Manager who makes over $1 billion daily through his investments. He has vast experience in trading with these currencies and has attracted global respect due to his commitments in the business world and Follow him Twitter.com.

George Soros Realizes that Democracy is not Appreciated by Everyone

It is a blessing for people to live within a democratic society. Millions of people all over the world enjoy this great opportunity. They live within societies that promote the democratic way of life and being. Democracy is a great form of government but not everyone agrees with the democratic way of life and read full article.

Nations such as North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Afghanistan and Cuba are definitely not democracies. The simple truth is that democracy does not work for a few of the nations on Earth. True, most nations are democracies in the general sense of the word. As a matter of fact, at least 123 of the 192 countries in the world are democracies and what George Soros knows.

George Soros is fond of a democracy. He knows that they provide the best opportunity for citizens and nations to develop. He is also aware that democracy will not realistically survive in societies with a specific political, religious, historical and cultural outlook and George Soros’s lacrosse camp.

hat makes a democracy? A democracy is simply defined by a nation’s ability to have free and fair elections by competing political parties. It also involves people being involved within a nation’s democratic processes. A government should also take a part in the democratic process as well. Other factors of a democracy include people being activity involved in civic life and the government protecting the rights of citizens.

While these seem like great features for a nation to have, not everyone agrees. North Korea is a socialist state with totalitarian overtones. They hold elections but they are not necessarily free or fair. Afghanistan is an Islamic Republic that could not realistically hold free and fair elections for choosing a leader. Other nations such as Saudi Arabia still have kings who rule their lands. Places such as Syria are ruled by dictators. Democracy would not survive in these nations and Follow his Twitter.

People have a lot of complaints against the democratic way of life. The top complaints that people make against this form of government is that it create wealth disparity, political instability and that the citizens can use it to their own ends. Once again, the democratic process is not for everyone and more information click here.

George Soros knows this and he fights hard to ensure that democracy remains a viable political system. He wants nations around the world to have a democratic society because they help to support an open society. An open society helps the democratic process to flourish and the democratic society provides the perfect background for an open society.

OFS supports many social, political and economic institutions that promote this political system. Soros wants people to have all of their liberties and the greatest opportunities to make a great life. People will have to be responsible for their lives but at least they will have the tools they need to take charge. To find out more about OFS and their work within open democratic societies read Inside Philanthropy.

More Visit: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1997/02/the-capitalist-threat/376773/